Chris asks…

What side effects would someone get if they took synthroid and they didn’t need it ,misdiagnosed?

Is it possible not to get side effects from Synthroid thyroxine t4 hormone when taking it for nothing. Is numbness or dull skin a possible side effect from syntroid.

Helen answers:

It is very dangerous … This is not medicine but a replacement for a missing hormone. Taking it like this could cause you to have a heart attack!

Curious as to why you say ‘misdiagnosed’ – perhaps not ….here is some info:

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless

David asks…

Are there side effects to thyroid hormone replacement?

I am only 24 years old and have just been diagnosed with an under active thyroid.

Pretty well all the women in my family have an under active thyroid which lead me to get tested. It doesn’t really affect my life having this condition, I would just say that it effects my mood swings and menstrual cycle more than anything, I can’t say I get overly tired (well not compared to my family), but I do struggle to loose weight (I currently weigh 165 lbs and stand 5″ 5)

So my question is, will going on the thyroid hormone replacement have any major side effects for me? Will I start to loose weight? or will it make me gain weight? will my mood swings settle down? I only ask on here as it is a touchy subject with the women in my family as they are all quite big..

Please let me know your experiences, thanks

Helen answers:

You may do better than the other ladies just because of getting diagnosed early … I say early since you are not having many of the symptoms yet. If anything, the medicine should help you to at least not gain further.

Info for you:
You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless

Maria asks…

my thyroid blood test is tsh 0.13*?

Free t4 = 25* pmol/L (11.0-21.0)
Free t3 = 4.3 pmol/L (3, 1.6.0)

TSH RECEPTOR ANTIBODIES = 5.4* lu /L (<1.8)

This is the results of my blood test . What do you think of think .

Helen answers:

You have Graves’ Disease.

The thyroid has receptors to take in signals from the brain, and it usually makes thyroid hormone only in response to the brain making thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH).

Sometimes the immune system mistakes the receptors in the thyroid for foreign cells, and attacks them with TSH receptor antibodies. In that case, the thyroid gets confused and thinks that it needs to make more thyroid hormone. That’s the situation in Grave’s disease.

Grave’s disease is a serious disease that must be treated. If it’s not treated, it will cause heart disease, psychiatric disease, tremor, weight loss, eye disease, and often death (generally that would take years but if a person’s unlucky it could cause a heart attack sooner). There are three broad possible categories for treatment:

– Radioactive iodine can be used. The thyroid uses iodine way more than any other part of the body. A low dose of radioactive iodine may be used to take pictures of the thyroid, a dose about a thousand times as high is used to damage the thyroid in treatment of Grave’s disease, and a dose another thousand times higher is used for thyroid cancers.
After treatment with a dosage to damage the thyroid for Grave’s disease, it’s likely (about 80% chance) that you would develop hypothyroidism and would need to take one pill per day of thyroid hormone. It’s possible (about 20% chance) that you would have the right amount of thyroid remaining for normal thyroid hormone levels despite Grave’s disease, and it’s possible (about 1% chance) that you would STILL have too much thyroid hormone production from the remaining thyroid tissue.
Radiation is NOT an option if you are pregnant or under age 18.

– You can take medication such as methimazole. These have the advantage that in about half of cases (and you’re a good candidate because you have a low positive antibody result) you would go into remission after about a year or so, and never need any further treatment. The disadvantage is that in a small portion of cases the drugs cause very serious side effects like an inability to make certain white blood cells, so you need to be monitored closely while on the medication.

– If neither medication nor radiation is a good option (or if neither one has worked), you may have either the entire or part of the thyroid removed. Afterwards, you might need to take thyroid hormone.

Donna asks…

Thyroid pain and recovery question?

Hello i am 17, i have had excruciating pain for over a year. My doctor told me my thyroid is not working i am going to see a special doctor next month, i had my blood drawn. This has caused my depression and my sleep loss and weight loss! I weight 82 pounds, but i eat about 5 meals a day. I go days without sleep! It hurts me to use the stairs and lift things, i heard if the doctors can’t help me i could slip into a coma is that true???? I also heard if they can help me then i will be able to sleep, use the stair on my own, gain weight, and not be depressed is this true??? I’m scared

Helen answers:

If you have Grave’s Disease, a disease in which the thyroid makes too much thyroid hormone, then yes, the treatment will help you to be able to sleep and gain weight, and it will probably help your depression and give you the energy to lift things and climb stairs (it will also help your heart).

Graves Disease has three possible treatments-
1. Radiating the thyroid so it can’t make thyroid hormone. If this destroys enough of the thyroid, you will then become hypothyroid (right now it sounds like you are hyperthyroid) and will need thyroid hormone replacement the rest of your life.
2. Medications that suppress the thyroid function. This sometimes causes the body to heal itself (remission) but the medications can have side effects. If it works well, you will not need future medication.
3. Surgery to remove the thyroid. Afterwards you would need to take thyroid replacement hormones.

Hyperthyroidism is pretty unpleasant, and the treatments are not totally safe, but they will probably change your life in a way that will make you feel a lot better.

Sharon asks…

My Shih Tzu puppy has myasthenia gravis. has anyone know of this disease in puppy’s?

Myasthenia gravis in dogs. How do they get it. I think from immunizations. Can anyone help me?

Helen answers:

I got this from a web site but they need doctor help and mediciene

Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease affecting the neuromuscular junction and producing weakness of voluntary muscles. It is a chronic disease deriving its name from Latin and Greek words meaning “grave muscle weakness.” This myasthenia gravis homepage contains a collection of LINKS to excellent sources of information needed by patients and families of patients to help them understand their disease, treatments and the side effects of medications. These sources are by no means the only (or even best) sources and patients should seek out others as well. NOTE: Decisions on individual treatments should always be determined by a physician. The information obtained here is for education only.

Powered by Yahoo! Answers