Daniel asks…

Anyone have information about eyelid lengthening surgery?

For graves disease or anything else i just need anything!

Helen answers:

I’m a Cosmetic Oculofacial Plastic Surgeon (Specializing in Eyelid and Facelift Surgery). Making a decision to lengthen the eye requires an understanding of the anatomic reasons for why you perceive your eye length to be short. There are several options depending on what the desired outcome is. For example, we perform a procedure to create “Almond Eyes” which in essence is a combination of lengthening the eye and lifting the outer corners using incisons placed behind the hairline in the temples. A consultation with a professional is important to understand what your options are.

Helen asks…

What hormone has the function of controlling eye size?

what hormone effects the size of our eyes …what hormone
can make our eyes go bigger?
plz answer if u are an expert at these things

Helen answers:

Only hormone affecting the size of the eye is Thyroid hormone(T3 n T4).
It can only pathologically increase the size of the eye by causing retro-orbital odema n inflammation.this occurs only when there is pathological increase in the amount of thyroid hormone in blood,which occurs in many abnormal conditions of thyroid gland like Grave’s disease.

Charles asks…

what do I do if celexa is making me feel tired?

Celexa is making my eyes feel heavy, and I don’t know if it’s actually giving me more anxiety or not. How do I know if celexa is working like it’s suppost to?

Helen answers:

Perhaps rather than the Celexa, it is whatever is causing the depression/anxiety …
Have you had your thyroid tested? You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless

James asks…

How long would a person with low blood pressure survive?

My 82 year old grandmother recently suffered a mild heart attack, this heart attach let her with low blood pressure and with a feeding tube. He currently is in grave condition and on the bed not speaking, jus communicating thuroug eye movements. I wuold like to know how long would she survive in this condition

Helen answers:

It’s impossible to answer that without knowing a lot more about the condition your grandmother is in. Low blood pressure is a symptom of something else going wrong, not a disease in itself, so the cause is much more important than the blood pressure itself. Depending on what the pressure is, what’s causing it, and the baseline blood pressure, it can be anything from normal baseline state to an indication of critical, life-threatening illness. Ask your grandmother’s doctors about her prognosis, they’re the ones who are in the best position to give you a meaningful answer.

Lizzie asks…

Does anyone know if there are any major side effects from having radioactive iodine therapy.?

When this is used for Graves disease or hyperthyroidism?

Helen answers:

Uh… Yeah… If you consider killing off a perfectly good VITAL organ a major side effect. They aren’t called vital organs for no reason. They are VITAL for you to live. And your thyroid is not sick. It is perfectly good. It is just dutifully following faulty instructions.

If your doctor didn’t tell you that radioactive iodine is NOT a cure for Grave’s disease, fire him immediately. It is very important that you understand that this is NOT a cure. After you have the radioactive treatment, you will still have Grave’s disease. Plus you will have an additional disease. You will have lifelong iatrogenic hypOthyroidism. You will have to be treated for the hypothyroidism every day for the rest of your life. And since you won’t have a thyroid for the Grave’s disease to attack, the Grave’s disease can start to attack other parts of your body. Like you skin, or worse yet, your eyes.

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