Nancy asks…

Hyperthyroidism?

I was recently diagnose with hyperthyroidism but the doctor told me because I am overweight it’s normal. But some other people have told me it’s not normak, and besides its also giving me alot of other side effects of the disorder like chest pain, nervousness, confusion and fast heart beats. Can some one tell me if it’s really ok to have hyperthyroidism being an overweight person?

Helen answers:

Not all people with hyperthyroidism lose weight. Sometimes the body will just adapt itself to a faster metabolism and your weight will stay the same. The most important thing here is getting your TSH and T3 levels back to normal. You cannot play with this disorder. Then, after you have reached a stable level, start exercising.
I’m talking from personal experience here. I had Grave’s Disease, and was 40 lbs overweight. I took my meds as perscribed, started slowly doing exercise, until i reached an excellent level of fitness, am taking Flaxseed oil extract and Omega Complex extracts, and have been in normal levels for over 5 years.
Try to avoid stress (this is where exercise will help you), try to avoid soy products, it’s possible that eating very large amounts of soy could impair your body’s ability to absorb this medication. In such cases, signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism may persist despite treatment with synthetic thyroid hormone.

Certain foods, medications and supplements — such as high-fiber foods, iron and calcium supplements, and some antacids — may also affect absorption of thyroid medication. To avoid this problem, take your thyroid medication on an empty stomach and separate from such foods, medications and supplements.

If you take synthetic thyroid hormone, consult your doctor before starting any new diets, medications or supplements.

And yes, being overweight might be a trigger for developing hyperthyroidism.

Ruth asks…

NEUROLOGY DISORDER OR HIGH TSH?

Cold wave through back side of head & sides, feeling nubness in arms & legs nervousness. I was admitted to hospital last month when it first occured. The severity was intense with blackout. CT scan of brain MRI of brain & CV junction was done, X-ray of neck & sinus was also done with all reports except the X-ray shows signs of mild sinucitis & spondalysys were normal. Blood & urine tests reports were normal. All was normal thereafter, but last saturday the attack was repeated with cold wave running through back side of the head, strange uneasiness in body, source being head. These attacks repeated several times for 2 days ranging from mild to serious. Consulted neurologist, he suggested EEG & TSH tests, EEG proved normal while TSH level is 10.3. The first abnormality so far. I have been offered Eltoxin 50, Olanex F, & Betacop TR. I am on medication for about 4 days, feeling 80% fit, but not completely well. There are feeling of dizziness, uneasiness in head & nervousness. Doctor is 100% confirm that I am having panic attacks nothing serious about me. Is he right? But i can feel what is happening to me. Can anyone help on this topic? Is this migrane, spondalysys or high TSH effect? thanks in advance.
thanks ## Chrissy ## for your answer, but I am only 28 yrs old & I have done ECG & Echo last september with normal results. Can I still have the cardiological problem you mentioned about?

Helen answers:

“offered Eltoxin 50” AND??? Are you not taking it? You need it to replace the thyroid hormone that your body is not producing (TSH 10.3). Levothyroxine (generic name) takes quite a while before you know the full effects. Now other meds can help some of the symptoms until the thyroid is helped. (BTW, migraine is common for HypOthyroidism)

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

James asks…

are these symptoms of add?..??.?

I can’t follow simple directions someone tells me I listen then after 15 seconds i can no longer comprehend what they say as if they are speaking another language!!

Also I can’t stay focused that long with out drifting away…I was diagnosed as a child w/ ADD and was put in meds. I am now 23 and have new signs

I park my car come out of the store and have NO idea where i parked. I don’t pay attention to things like that….while all my other friends don’t seem to have this issue

also i am CONSTANTLY losing things. I lose my keys after 20 mins of searching I find them then when i am ready to leave i will MISPLACE them again!! I know the first symptoms i listed are add but what bout misplacing things/not paying attention to where i park?

Helen answers:

Yes i have had your symptoms. In my case, autoimmune pernicious anaemia (unable to absorb vitamin B12). Highly recommended to try sublingual (under the tongue) B12 and chelated magnesium to start with and see how you go.

“Can’t find your keys? Mood swings? Brain fog? Or is just age? These lapses in memory can cause grave concern- but could it really be something simple? 40% of Americans are Vitamin B12 deficient…don’t be one of them! >>> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5QP5NjaFjPo

You may have brain fog if you are experiencing any of these symptoms:

Loss of mental acuity
Forgetfulness – decreased short-term memory
A feeling of spaciness and inability to think clearly
A feeling that you’re in a fog or a dark cloud is over your head
Decreased attention span
Mild depression and/or anxiety
Lack of spatial awareness

Brain fog may be the result of:

*Adrenal fatigue syndrome

*Insomnia / sleep deprivation

*Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)

*Nutritional deficiencies – Deficiencies of magnesium, vitamin B-12, and amino acids can cause significant brain impairment such as lack of concentration, short-term memory loss, attention deficit, and spaciness (or lack of focus)

*Candidiasis

*Disorders such as fibromyalgia or multiple sclerosis (MS)

*Chronic viral infections such as Epstein-Barr, Lyme disease, hepatitis, cytomegalovirus

*Parasitic organisms found in the brain

*Heavy metal toxicity

*Reduced blood flow to the brain due to circulatory problems

*Overuse of artificial sweeteners and MSG

*Allergies and food intolerances such as to gluten and lactose

*Leaky gut syndrome

*Side effects of prescription and over-the-counter medications

*Constipation

*Menopause

*Sick building syndrome (fumes from new carpets, paints, insulation, chipboard, wood treatments, pesticides, carbon monoxide, poor ventilation)

http://www.jigsawhealth.com/resources/brain-fog-causes

Ken asks…

Constant Dizziness and lightheadedness, slight pressure in head and ears?

Maybe someone can help me on here but for the past week and a half, i have been constantly dizzy and lightheaded, and having slight pressure on the sides of my head near the ear! It just happened, but the feeling of it, it was much like a “rollercoaster” effect, where i would shift my head or eyes and i would feel like it would be where you stand up too fast when u are sitting or lying down! Ive had a blood and urine test and both are completely normal….i have another appointment on Tuesday to check my thyroid, and then another appointment on Wednesday to see a Neurologist! It just feels like i’m off balance and idk what else i can do about it! I think it may be from allergies? Ive taken Meclizine and Claritin for the past couple days but it hasnt really helped, i do feel some progress, but its still there! I dont have any ringing in my ears, and it doesnt feel like the room is spinning, i just feel woozy and dizzy! Please help, this is incredibly frustrating and i feel so fatigued all the time and feel like if i go out and hang out with friends and stuff, that i will feel like this and it will ruin my time with them! I am 22 years old almost turning 23! Im an active person but havent worked out since this started happening

Helen answers:

I am glad that you are having a thyroid test … Just INSIST they do a THOROUGH testing. All of this can be from the thyroid.

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

Daniel asks…

can hypothyroid go away?

i know a woman that was on synthroid for 25 years…..around menopause, she had a thyroid storm……that was a couple of years ago…..around that time she had to switch doctors….the new doctor says her thyroid is fine now and she no longer has hypothyroid and has kept her off synthroid…he is supposedly ‘world renowned’ I’ve been to world renowned doctors for something else–and they were clueless….the next local inexperienced doc i went to knew what it was right away….

is it possible that hypothyroid reverses itself.

she is having fatigue, weight gain, hair loss….but she also has RA and bad , debilitating side effects from cholesterol meds (that the same doctor insist she takes and won’t try something else)…and hypothyroid is associated with increased cholesterol….
she refused to go to a new doctor for a long time, she finally agreed, but is insisting on going to another world renowned doctor with a 4 month wait……the current doctor suggested thyroid cancer based on 1 nodule–and screwed up the biopsy (didn’t get enough cells) and wants her to pay for another one….

Helen answers:

It does NOT reverse but one can be put on too high of dose & go HypER (the storm she had) until it is corrected. This is VERY dangerous.

She has to be on the Synthroid but at the right dose UNLESS miraculously she has been healed of the HypO … That is the ONLY way!

NOW, it is possible that she was not HypO to begin with (but now clearly is w/ those current symptoms) — some doctors gave that for women to lose weight! That is SOOOO dangerous & is what has screwed up some womens thyroids for real!

Please show her this & encourage her to research for herself.

Here is some general info & GOOD links:
Thyroid disease is missed more than found. Three reasons: 1) not checking for antibodies; 2) going by wrong TSH ‘normal’ range; and, 3) not listening to symptoms.

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2, like maybe ONE) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning [different antibodies]).

You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb for Hashi’s] They can code so that ins will pay.

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless you

p.s. Rarely is it cancer

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Steven asks…

I have severe Vertigo and I think Im going to die.Please can you read my symptoms and offer some advice?

I am a 37 year old woman with 2 kids (boy4 girl9).
I get severe neck pains.I use Ibuprofen. Often I feel like the room is spinning. Dizziness the morning. I am light headed. I weak up every morning as if I have had a massive hang over- despite the fact I’m a nondrinker! I get eager to open bowls.I often feel a little better after going to the bathroom and passing stools.Too much wind/gas. Stomach bloated (similar to a 8 month pregnant woman)(im not pregnant) I get exhausted and often sleep 10-14 hours every night At 6.30pm I just want to go to bed.. My breathing goes when excited or upset.

Sometimes I feel lack of oxygen when sleeping.

I am on a strong antibiotic 500mg Clarithromy

One of the side effects of this is vertigo! But this is not the cause because I have vertigo before.

I feel like I get dragged to one side.

Just for reference did have a gall bladder removed in 2004 due to stones in common bial duct.

Too much yawning and shivers.

I now have problems driving and sometimes even walking.
I get a little pain where I had the Op to remove gall bladder but I dont think this is the cause of the problems.

IF ANYONE RECOGNISES SYMPTOMS OR HAS ANY IDEAS WHAT I CAN DO TO IMPROVE MY SITUATION- PLEASE CAN YOU ADVISE ME.- urgently.

The doctors are not helpful.

Helen answers:

Have you had your thyroid tested? You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

Sharon asks…

Thyroid Hormone replacement meds…?

I was diagnosed a little over a year ago with Graves disease…hyperthyroidism. I put on about 200 lbs and lost about 100 of those 200 and then gained about 50 of it back after I had my thyroid removed in April of ’06. I am currently taking synthroid to replace the hormone. My question is how long does it take to regulate the meds so Im not changing the dosage every 6 weeks and what else can I take to boost my metabolism and energy since the meds arent really helping in that situation. And forget the gym, my dr. says its still too risky for me to do any type of exercising…even walking. And my second question is since I cant get into see the dr. to have my meds refilled because she is never around and Im out of meds tomorrow what are the side effects of not taking the meds and how long do I have before my health seriously starts to worsen. Ive been feeling sick for the past 2 days and Im afraid its just going to get worse with the lack of meds. Thanks for your time…

Helen answers:

It can take 6 months to a year to find the right dosage. If you are out of your medication, call up the doctor’s office immediately. You should not go without it for any length of time.

Now that you are hypothyroid, learn as much as you can about the condition and the treatment. It’s the only way to get your life back. You say you are on Sythroid, on Synthroid you want the TSH in the morning to be below 2.0.

I was diagnosed hypothyroid 6 years ago. I started out on Levoxyl. It did nothing for my symptoms, but it did lower TSH. I was not happy wih this result, so I bought thyroid books and did a lot of research on the web. I am now almost completely symptom free on Armour thyroid. On Armour however, the dosage is adjusted by the free t4 and free T3, not the TSH.

Below are some thyroid links. If you get our morning TSH around 1.0 and you still can’t lose weight it can be that you need a T4/T3 med like Armour or its possible the weight gain has caused insulin resistance. Insulin resistance (prediabetes) is diagnosed by a fasting glucose anda fasting insulin test

Thomas asks…

What do you think about ‘pre-existing condition’ exemptions in the insurance industry?

I have a close friend who’s wrestling with a difficult decision. She’s suffering from a rare form of cancer, and a half-year of treatment at the local research hospital has left her worse than she began, which is statistically typical for this hospital.

There are, incidentally, two hospitals in the country that have drastically higher rates of survival for her form of cancer, largely helped by doctor specialization and, in one hospital’s case, rare equipment. The problem is, one is in New York and the other is in Texas. If she leaves the west coast for a certain length of time, she loses her insurance (which is local), and cannot gain coverage under any new insurance plan, given that her cancer is of course a pre-existing condition that she’s now well aware of. Her best option, as of now, is to embark on a personal fund-raising mission and attempt to seek better treatment completely without insurance coverage.

Of course, ‘pre-existing condition’ clauses are necessary to a competitive and capitalistic insurance industry – if a company provided treatment to people who already needed coverage, they would simply be bankrupted by people loading onto whoever had the best coverage; there would be no incentive for people without significant medical expenses to contribute to insurance anymore.

Of course, the immediate reflex for some is to propose a public system – a nationwide system (or even a multinational network of systems) would allow people to move physically to specialized treatment without having to be artificially confined to the locations of their insurance companies. But, as I understand it, a public system is bad because its creation involves the invocation of Communist magic, which may have the side effect of waking Stalin from his grave, who will proceed to unstoppably rape babies (I’m a bit unclear on the details of the mechanics, but the main criticism of the public option seems to be a simple cry of “socialism!” coupled with an expression of terror and rage).

So, what, other than die, do you suppose people with life-threatening ‘pre-existing conditions’ should do? Is a public insurance plan an option? Why or why not?

Helen answers:

What I can’t understand is how every other civilized nation has a national healthcare system. People aren’t dropping like flies in Canada or Europe last I heard.

Who has the highest and worst record for heart disease. It’s the US. People have to second mortgage their homes just to send their kids to college.

These are not communist countries that have national health and education systems they just have different ideas and values.

At one time our healthcare system worked, but when you have no immigration control, of course the poorest and most exploited people will fall on everyone else except the pigs that increase their profits by exploiting these people.

When you really look at most of the problems in the US, it’s due to the greed of the wealthy ruling class. They own government and their lobbyist write the laws.

Can you believe Americans have to send away to Canada to get affordable drugs that are made by American companies in America.

Do you want it with or without grease cuz we’re getting F***ed.

About 10 years ago I went to a doctor when I had a cold I coundn’t shake. I was between jobs and no health insurance. For 5 minutes to go in and have the doctor write a script, I was billed $150.00. This made me sicker than the flu.

This is legal? I was extorted for $150 or I don’t get the antibiotics.

Linda asks…

Goitre (throat thing)?

anybody ever had this throat ‘condition’: goitre? or do you know anything about it, just wondering what to expect and stuff =) thanks

Helen answers:

Understanding Goiter — the Basics
What Are Goiters?
Goiters can be any one of several types of growths in the thyroid gland, located at the base of the front side of the neck just below the Adam’s apple. In the case of Graves’ disease, the entire thyroid gland becomes enlarged. Another type, called toxic nodular goiter, results when one or more nodules, or adenomas, develop in the thyroid and trigger excess production of thyroid hormone.

A goiter may be a temporary problem that will remedy itself over time without medical intervention, or a symptom of another, possibly severe, thyroid condition that requires medical attention.

What Causes Them?
Goiters can occur when the thyroid gland produces either too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism) or not enough (hypothyroidism). Much more rarely, the problem may arise when the pituitary gland stimulates thyroid growth to boost production of the hormone.

Another type of thyroid growth, called a sporadic goiter, can form if your diet includes too many goiter-promoting foods, such as soybeans, rutabagas, cabbage, peaches, peanuts and spinach. These foods can suppress the manufacture of thyroid hormone by interfering with your thyroid’s ability to process iodide. Historically the most common cause used to be due to a lack of iodide in the diet, however in the 1920’s iodized salt was introduced in the United States now making this a rare cause of goiters.

Understanding Goiter — Treatment
How Do I Know If I Have It?
A goiter may be large enough for you to see or to feel with your hand, or it may remain unnoticed until a doctor discovers it, perhaps during a routine exam.

In any case, the first step is to determine whether the goiter is a symptom of another thyroid condition. An ultrasound of the thyroid gland may help to determine the size of the gland and the presence of nodules. Radioactive iodide uptake tests track how much iodide the thyroid takes in within a certain time period. Higher-than-normal amounts indicate possible hyperthyroidism; low levels indicate hypothyroidism. Blood tests also can measure levels of thyroid hormone.

What Are the Treatments?
A goiter may require no treatment, especially if it is small and thyroid hormone levels are normal. However, if the goiter develops because of excessive thyroid hormone production, fails to produce enough hormone or causes discomfort, you will need treatment.

Treatment involves getting the thyroid hormone levels back to normal, usually with medication. When the medication takes effect, the thyroid may begin to return to its normal size. However, a large nodular goiter with a lot of internal scar tissue will not shrink with treatment. If the goiter is uncomfortable, causes overproduction of thyroid hormone unresponsive to medications, or becomes cancerous, the entire thyroid gland may have to be surgically removed.

Chris asks…

levothyroxine prescribed for thyroid, question…..?

my doctor prescribed levothyroxine based on my tsh levels being 29.7. he sent me for more blood work on the rest of my “T” levels, or its called a thyroid panel think. Anyways, he said in the meantime that hes prescribing me 25mg of levothyroxine, so my question is, is this a relatively safe small dose to test out if I will have side effects or benefits. I went in for blood work for my heart originally, and my doctor noticed my TSH levels wer high. I did not tell my doctor about feeling exhausted and to the point where my memory was so bad I would forget what I was talking about mid sentence. This explains alot now. Im not faund of taking pills as I get anxiety, so Im wondering if this low dose is not as bad as the higher doses for testing how it will effect me?

Helen answers:

That is very high TSH! Did they also test for antibodies? If not, you need it.

This is something that cannot be rushed therefore they start w/ a low dose. It is also slow acting so it takes some time before you know what it is doing. You will be retested every 6 wks to start & it can take a few months until you are at your optimum dose.

Take this 1st thing, on an empty stomach then do not eat for 1/2 hr.

I will suggest this: You should also take Selenium, Folic Acid, D3, Zinc, and B Complex. Later, you may ask the doc to add Cytomel.

Here is some info & good links for you:
You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

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Mandy asks…

Do I have sleep apnea? or some other disorder?

I have had organic depression, and an anxiety, and panic disorder, and a bad thyroid. I take medication for this. Its been a few years, and its helped noticeably with the depression, but I’m still tired all the time, and sleep way too much. The thing is, I tend to almost always have a headache when waking up, or going to sleep. And sometimes it lasts during the day. Its never been unbearable, but very irritating. I am overweight by quite a bit, but I can still walk, exercise, and I’m not considered obese at all. Just overweight. I recently began a Peskatarian diet, and started exercising, and eating healthier. I take Prozac, Singular, and Levoxathroxin. When I started taking these meds, I didn’t have any side effects. But I noticed now that if i forget or run out of my meds, I get nose bleeds, get bad depression, and headaches. I was basically wondering what the headaches could be from. Is it my meds, sleep apnea? Ive had several blood tests, and they have always came back good, except the thyroid issue. Would cancer, or sleep apnea show up in a blood test? Please if you can, let me know if i should be worried or not.
I do have Asthma. But Iv’e never noticed hard breathing, or snoring when I sleep, nor has anyone else. I don’t get short of breath unless I don’t take my singular, and even then, barely. I do have a confession though. I don’t go to bed until around 1:30-2:30 in the morning, and sleep in until around 10-12 when I don’t work. I also watch allot of tv, and spend a regular amount of time on the computer… Could this be effecting my headaches? Also, I just got a job a few months ago, which I realized the headaches didn’t start until after I started working. I work In a grooming salon. Any of these life events the reason?
One more thing is that I don’t really have any physical pain, like body aches etc. Is that a good sign its not cancer related? And I have a weird habit of moving my eyes to the back of my head and to the side, I think this sometimes causes a slight head discomfort

Helen answers:

ALL of these problems come from thyroid disease. Sleep Apnea is detected by having a sleep study done … No pain at all.

Perhaps your Levo dose is no longer high enough for you. You should be being retested every 6 mos.

Here is some info & good links:
You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. They can code so that ins will pay.

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

Maria asks…

synthroid/levothyroxine Help?

I started Thyroid treatment due to Hypothyroidism and started off with 25 then 50 and then 75 of Levothyroxine over a 9 month period. With the 25 i felt better and 50 i felt good but the 75 gave me shortness of breath and i felt like i was stressing out. I also had other side effects like being agitated easily, brain fog, and irritibility. After waiting it out for 3 months expecting the symptoms to subside i couldn’t take it anymore and stopped taking the medication for 4 days. I stopped taking it for 4 days then started taking the lower dosage (50). It has been about 5 weeks now and i feel like i am getting better but how long will it take to feel like i did on the 50?
Any help would be greatly appreciated

Helen answers:

You are playing w/ fire! Change meds ONLY under the supervision of a GOOD doctor. Those symptoms are symptoms of the disease itself. The meds are very slow acting and what you take now may not show for 3 or 4 wks or so.

You need to ask for Cytomel also.

You should also take Selenium, Folic Acid, D3, Zinc, and B Complex.

Take your meds right…. 1st thing, on empty stomach, & do not eat (or drink coffee) for 1/2 hr. Also, if you take calcium, iron or acid reducer, do not take for 3 hrs.

Here is other info:
You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. They can code so that ins will pay.

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

Laura asks…

What does this mean and should I have it checked by my doctor?

Last January I was diagnosed with Benin thyroid module. I was not put on any medicine because it wasn’t doing anything to me besides making things hard to swallow. Well recently I was put on Depo births control shot. Before i was put on the shot I started losing more hairs then normal. A side effect of the shot is hair loss but i was losing hair before I was on the shot. I have also been feeling fatigue and having a loss of apatite. I have also noticed that my bones have been sore…what does that mean?And should I go have my thyroid checked out since I am experiencing some of the symptoms of thyroid problems?

Helen answers:

YES!

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb] They can code so that ins will pay.

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

John asks…

hello every one my question is i have severe hairloss help me what to do?

i have a severe hairloss in which my scalp can be seen i used to have thin hair but soon after having 2 kids i started losing my hair right from the crown area i m 27 yrs old and my doc said it will take around 2 yrs to get back to my normal hair with no medication i have used medicines like gnc hair suppl.. and rogaine but these products have side effects like the hair started growing on my face so don’t want to use it anymore i m suffering from a severe hairloss plz help me what should i do to get my hair back

Helen answers:

Have you had your thyroid tested? You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless

Robert asks…

Does anyone know what I have?

So I recently started taking Adoxa and Robinul like two weeks ago. However, recently, my throat is feeling clogged with something and I always have a really hoarse voice when I speak. I drink water all of the time but it never goes away. Now, my nose is all stuffed also. I don’t have a fever or anything but I do tend to be really weak and drop stuff all of the time on accident. Is this a normal side effect of these antibiotics?

Helen answers:

Have you had your thyroid tested? You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

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Linda asks…

Lithium and thyroid problem?

Hello.
I´m diagnosed with BP2 and GAD. I take Literarex 6 tablets a day, the bottle says”Litarex 6mmol +” and “42 mg Li+(6mmolLi+) I think this is quite a lot but still I only get to 0.5 of the stuff in the blood and as I understand it 0.7-1.1 are the therapeutic level.
I also use 20 mg cipralex, 4 mg rivotril and 90 mg mianserin.
To the point. My thyroid was 7.5 in the last blood test and my doctor told me that 2.5 was normal.
He prescribed me with thyroid hormone called “Levaxin” 100 micro gram per day.
I am not content with taking medicine for side effects.
Q1 Can Lithium permanently damage my thyroid gland?
Q2 Is the slow thyroid the reason I am fat even though I eat healthy?
Q3 What can I do, is for example lamictal as effective as lithium?
Q4 Is 7.5 high in thyroid gland
I hope some one has something to say about this I am most concern about Q1.

With kind regards GPI

Helen answers:

From what I have studied, Lithium is definitely one of the many things that can trigger thyroid disease.

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. They can code so that ins will pay.

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

Carol asks…

Will taking Carbimazole medicine will cause sore throat?

I was dianogsed that i have Graves Disease. My doc said that mine was serious but till then i do not need a surgery. He quickly prescribe Carbimazole and Propanol(IF IM NOT MISTAKEN.. IS RED IN COLOUR) i was ask 2 take Carbimazole for 30mg per day n the red tablet is divided into 2 and take it 4 twice a day. I remember my doc told me that Carbimazole has side effects. They were that my hair will drop n my bone density decrease. He told me that if i have had sore throat for a week then i probably not suitable for the medicine and this is what im having now. It is not a very painful sore throat. But im wondering if it the Carbimazole that is affecting my body in the body. Should i consult my doc again?

Helen answers:

I started out with 10 mg of methimazole, then 5 mg, then 2.5 once a day. Maybe he needs to reduce your meds. Good luck

Neutropaenia:
About 1 patient in 1,000 will develop neutropaenia in the early weeks of treatment. This presents as a severe sore throat and severe malaise. You must warn the patient prospectively about this possibility, and advise them to stop the carbimazole at once if the symptom develops. The patient should also get a blood test the same day, and if the diagnosis is confirmed would need to be admitted to hospital.

Daniel asks…

WHY DID I MISS MY PERIOD?

okay, so this isn’t anything new, Im 14 and well always late with my period..about 2-3 weeks, i believe because im still developing and PUBERTY!! hhaahhaa.
but i 10 kgs overweight, started a diet 2 months ago..i have been so stressed, i can’t stop thinking if im going to lose the weight or not and we have loads of projects and work at school,chores at home with me having to take care of my granny… and i havn’t had my period for a month now..so am i missing my period becaus of stress? if so how can i reduce it..??
THANKS

Helen answers:

Yes, stress can definitely cause irregularities in your period. But it also sounds like you’re irregular a lot. You might also just have an atypically long cycle -the 28-days thing is an average, for some women it’s shorter, for some it’s longer. It’s normal for things to be weird when you’re 14, it can take a long time for your period to reach a settled cycle.

As for reducing your stress -stop worrying about your weight! More than likely your diet is doing more harm than good -dietary changes, particularly not getting enough food or a nutritional/vitamin deficiency, can cause missed or late periods. If you want to get healthy, you need to do permanent lifestyle changes, not a temporary diet; if it’s temporary, the weight will come right back as soon as you stop the diet. My advice would be to just eat healthy (not to follow a strict calorie-counting regime, just hold back from that second helping of dessert, kind of thing; try to make half your diet fruits and veggies, one quarter carbs, one quarter protein), and most importantly exercise more -not only can this help with your weight, it’s one of the best stress-reduction methods. Exercise releases endorphins (feel-good brain chemicals). Worry less about school -stay on top of things by all means, but don’t be so hard on yourself, you’re a teenager, you don’t have to be perfect.

If you go three months without your period, and/or if your period doesn’t settle into a more regular cycle within a year or so, you should talk to a doctor about possible underlying causes. PCOS, endometriosis, fibroid cysts, and other reproductive ailments, can all cause irregularities and missed periods; so, too, can a host of illnesses not directly related to reproductive ailments, like thyroid problems and Graves Disease. This is HIGHLY unlikely however, but is something to keep in mind if this keeps happening.
Either way you should think about getting on the pill -it is the best possible treatment for several of the afore-mentioned reproductive illnesses. Even if you’re perfectly healthy, it also regulates and lightens your period, reduces cramping, can help clear skin, and lowers your risk of cervical & ovarian cancer. (Even if you’re not planning on becoming sexually active any time soon -which I would NOT advise -it’s good to be protected, and the beneficial side effects are remarkable.)

Robert asks…

Feels like waaay early onset dementia?

I am 28 and have been diagnosed and unsuccessfully treated for what seems like a lot of things and wonder if maybe they point to a different problem with a different treatment. Any thoughts?

I am desperate for answers, relief, and a life. I have been on different combinations of somewhere around 25 medications for these diagnoses and still find no relief. I was seeing an improvement about a year ago and actually picked up a hobby, but about 6 months ago everything started going downhill again and I am back to where I started. Medications either do nothing, keep me overly sedated or numb, start out great and then peter out, or cause side effects. Dr’s just keep throwing more medications at me and I’m getting sick of being a toxic dump site.

Some of these diagnoses clash with each other, but every time they change my Dr the new person changes what they think I have. I have been diagnosed with: major depression, bipolar I, bipolar II, inattentive adhd, social anxiety, sensory processing disorder, generalized anxiety, insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and seasonal affective disorder.

I am currently on Ambien, Remeron (which seems to counter act the Ambien but is supposed to help with sleep), Cymbalta, Depakote, and Ritalin (which isn’t being very helpful either).

I’m depressed, irritable (some times more than others), anxious, can’t sleep a normal schedule, tired all the time even if I do end up getting adequate sleep. I’m also scared of things I know I shouldn’t be afraid of (like aliens, monsters in woods, home invasions), have gruesome and pervasive thoughts of bad things happening to me or those I love, when I’m not on meds I have a short and explosive temper that usually ends with me hitting or throwing something. I have random, traveling pains that can feel like shooting nerve pain or aching muscles or joints. I have OCD like tendencies as well, I do this thing with my toes where I flick the big toe with the one next to it and can get stuck on it and do it so much that I get a blister or bleed, lately I have a problem with my thumbs with locking the joints and I don’t know how to describe the rest of the thumb problem but the joints and muscles are getting really sore but I can’t stop. I startle very easily and take a very long time to recover, sometimes my fingers will go numb from being startled by something dumb in a safe situation.

Here are some newer things that are troubling me because they seem to be getting worse. I can’t keep my attention lately. I’ll skip from one thing to another if my eye gets caught by something else, like news stories or websites. I can’t keep my place while reading, I end up skipping ahead to read a sentence or two, then go back and find where I was reading before. My reading comprehension has gone way down, I sometimes have to read a sentence very, very slowly and deliberately a few times before I can move on. Sometimes I’ll finish reading a paragraph and have no idea what I just read. I’ve started to put words into sentences that aren’t there or changing the words that are. I’ve read headlines on a news site and will go back some time later and see if anythings changed and be surprised when the headline I read earlier about cats now says cars. Its hard for me to speak or even type because I will be trying to get my thoughts out and blank on a word, lose my train of thought, or just plain can’t get the thought to my mouth or fingers. I feel dumb because I can’t seem to learn as quickly as I have always been able to. Jokes tend to go over my head and I take things very literal. I’m also having serious problems with losing track of time, I’ll be doing something and look up what feels like 10 minutes later and its been an hour.

Any ideas? Thanks so much.

Helen answers:

You should get your thyroid checked. Have them do a full thyroid panel, which includes your TSH levels, FT4 levels and FT3 levels. You should also be tested for TPO anti bodies as well as the ones that cause Grave’s Disease. Untreated thyroid problems can frequently manifest as psychiatric problems or dementia. They can even cause full blown psychosis. Unfortunately, too many doctors don’t think to check for thyroid problems even though it’s just a simple blood test and the treatment is simple too.

Jenny asks…

Celexa (Citalopram) Issues?

Okay so I recently started taking celexa for seasonal depression. I have had a number of sideeffects that I think can be associated with the medicine.
Physical sideeffects: heartburn, stomach-ache when i eat (symptoms of acid reflux?), fainting because of lack of food.
Emotional sideeffects: numbness, worsening depression.
Should I switch? According to my family I am noticeably nicer, however I feel much more miserable and my grades have gone down in school. I hate school now due to depression and I feel no reason to wake up.
Also will the stomach-ache and heartburn symptoms go away after switching from celexa to another antidepressant (probably another ssri?
If you can answer any of these PLEASE help.

Helen answers:

With all this, you need your thyroid checked!

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2, like maybe ONE) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. [anti-TPO and TgAb] They can code so that ins will pay.

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless you

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Ruth asks…

PCOS/ Thyroid disorder: How to naturally & internally heal PCOS & Thyroid?

I have excess hair growth and it’s extra course also. I am hoping to find a way to finally reduce my hair growth and the courseness. I am sure other women here understand this concern. I just want to be health but it does also steal some of my self esteem having the extra and stubborn body hair.
I have PCOS and possibly a thyroid disorder. What are the odds my PCOS is really stemming from Thyroid disorder? I am looking for homeopathic remedies for PCOS as well as hormone balancing and maybe any herbs or natural supplements that could help balance whatever is causing my increase of hair on the stomach, chest, and upper thighs. There are other side effects that are really taking a tole in my life and I just really want to be healed. Thank you for any help! I feel like there must be a way to cure this naturally and internally. I am willing to go on a very strict (and I mean VERY strict!) in order to heal and cure these issues Thyroid and PCOS. It’s worth changing my life hard core for a year or two to improve these symptoms for the rest of my life. Mood, hair growth, weight, tiredness, dry skin, anemia…..so on. Thank you.

Helen answers:

PCOS does often happen along w/ Thyroid disorder.

You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

God bless

Mandy asks…

Just started Prozac went off and now i’m feeling so sick :(?

I just started prozac 4 days ago (was taking 20mg) it made me feel HORRIBLE i had almost every single side effect listed on the paper. I felt almost as if i was drunk and didn’t realize what was going on. I called my doctor and she told me to stop taking it. I have been off of it for 2 days but the past two days i am still feeling sick, have a fever, and really bad lower back pain and pressure on my lower stomach, i thought something was really wrong so i went to the doctor again and they tested me for everything and said that i was fine wasn’t a bladder infection or kidney or anything. They think it is still side effects from the medicine, just wondering if anyone else has had this?

Helen answers:

Have you had your thyroid tested (a main cause of depression)? You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) BUT…….. Would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

God bless

Richard asks…

Thyroid medicine question?

I have an inflamed thyroid. It’s not huge, about 7 cm, and about 9 months ago it was 5 cm so it is getting bigger. My blood test for my thyroid comes back normal. I am on anti depressants which I heard alter that test, but my doctor gave me Synthroid 25 mg. I took half a pill every other day, with no side effects. I then started taking 25mg once daily and I started a new anti depressant, Wellbutrin, which made me get more anxiety and lightheadedness. I assumed this was from the wellbutrin which I stopped and went back to Prozac. I was switched to Armour thyroid 15mg daily and i still have the anxiety levels and increased sweating, etc. I’m wondering if this means the dose is to high?? I only took a half a t ablet this morning and i have so much swelling in my legs!!
I have no energy, I’m tired all the time.

Helen answers:

“My blood test for my thyroid comes back normal.” then why the meds etc???

You need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

God bless

Carol asks…

Hypothyroidism question?

Ever since I had my third child I have been growing little whiskers under my chin. I pluck them but it is a pain in the ass. I have read a lot about hypothyroidism and I have a lot of the symptoms and I have a doctors appointment to be checked out. I was just wondering if the annoying little hairs are a side effect also and if I get on medication will it stop? Thanks

Helen answers:

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless

Charles asks…

I am dealing with hyperthyrodism at this time and I feel very tired all of the time. please offer advice?

I was recently diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and they are actually giving me Synthroid. Go figure. My doctor said that it is to give my thyroid a rest. Please give me any advice to treat and overcome.

Helen answers:

Find a new doc.. Now.

Hyperthyroid…. When the gland is OVER producing thyroid hormone due to something being wrong… The ‘something’ is usually autoimmune, either Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (which cycles between hyPER and hyPO until the antibodies destroy the gland completely) or Grave’s disease, where antibodies trigger the thyroid gland to over produce, period.

Adding MORE thyroid hormone by way of giving you Synthetic T4 is NOT going to do anything to help reduce your hyPERthyroid symptoms..

You NEED to get the hyper state stopped.. Reversed.. And then, if needed add back thyroid hormone if the gland is backed off too far…

This doc is absolutely clueless in what he is doing and it’s making your condition worse, not better.

In addition to that.. If you remain in a hyper state too long ( and that varies on how severe the hyper state becomes and it’s stresses to the body) your treatment options are reduced from 3 (antithyroid medication, survery, RAI) to only one, RAI (which has the longest list of side effects both long and short term).

Don’t let this doc ‘neglect’ into losing your options and being forced into the one that is easiest for him, and potentially the most harmful to you.

To put this in perspective…. If you got a sunburn bad enough to peel skin.. Would you want to go sit in a sauna while wearing a pair of long johns??

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Robert asks…

what the best medicine for atypical lymphocytes?and what is the main causes of this?and how to prevent?

Helen answers:

What can cause atypical lymphocytes?
Most common cause is disease called infectous mononucleuosis, other causes are rare and bad like maligenancy. SM MD Infections will cause elevated lymphocytes, and i believe some autoimmune or thyroid problems (graves disease) Read More »
Source: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_can_cause_atypical_lymphocytes
What causes both atypical lymphocytes and ovalocytes?
Atypical lymphocytes – are caused by viral infections, may be noted in lymphocytic leukemia, and may be seen in allergies. Ovalocytes are typically seen in cases of low hemoglobin or red blood cells counts, ie anemia. Sometimes even a sligh… Read More »
Source: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_causes_both_atypical_lymphocytes_a .

Target therapy can address atypical lymphocytes both for prevention and cure.

The symptoms cited———an offshoot of blocked energy + accumulated toxins in Thyroid & Parathyroid, lymphatic system, Spleen, hormonal imbalance with a displaced solar plexus.

‘Target Therapy’ [Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies] proved to be effective for all types of cancer [including brain tumors, leukemia, melanoma, Crohn’s Disease, breast cancer, etc., ] & all the most dreaded and incurable diseases.

TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
Target Therapy—Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

Dr.Vora designed it in such a way that the costs are the least for the survival/rescue of common man and the poor in villages, towns and metropolis on the globe; with NO insurance cover. It is most suitable to all the youngsters on this entire globe.
U may study it, discuss with Ur family members/friends/acquaintances and slowly and steadily implement it for the best results.

•No side effects and no risk. If it clicks, mostly possible, U shall have a cure. Lest, the therapy keep mum. No extra risk. It is the most suitable line of treatment even for the terminally ill patients. Cancer cure/prevention is quite possible. U may try it for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, Leukemia, HIV/AIDS, Crohn’s Syndrome, Gilbert’s Syndrome, colon cancer, Thalassemia, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, bone TB., Tinnitus, all brain & spinal cord disorders, CLL, Crohn’s Syndrome, endometriosis, etc., —it should aim @ [3] steps.
1. Removal of toxins from all internal organs & purging through Normal Drainage systems, feces, urine, menses [females], skin, lungs.
• 2. Activating all the internal organs to make each & every organ to function up to optimum levels.
3. Supplying vitamins, nutrients, micro-nutrients, minerals, trace elements for invigorating the entire Immune system to produce antibodies.

PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,—an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.
Dr.Vora, the world renowned Acupressurist, an octogenarian and the Bhishma Pithamaha of acupressure in India— treated and caused to treat more than 150000 cases of Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, irregular menses and also many other most dreaded diseases.

Michael asks…

i just found out today that my thyroid level is high. its a 10.100 and my T4 is 0.75, that is hypo right?

i am scheduled to see an Endo next week, however i dont know much about this diease. if anyone is on the meds for this can you tell me a bit about side effects etc…….thanks

Helen answers:

Yes that is high meaning hypO. However, were you checked for antibodies? If not, the TSH may mean nothing.

Need testing for ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH should be .3 – 3 but would not matter if antibodies are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse …OR Graves Disease (hypER).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find thyroid disease. May have to go to more than one before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html

God bless

Carol asks…

Can someone give me an idea of what might be going on with me?

I’ve had chronic constipation since childhood (I’m 23 now) And when I do go to the bathroom, it’s pellet-like. I’ve also had chronic bad breath since childhood. And for the past few years, I’ve had a swollen tongue with teeth indentations on both sides. My tongue isn’t in pain or anything. Just swollen and easily coated. Especially after I eat. It also doesn’t take much for it to become dry. I tested negative for hypothyroidism and sjogren’s. I am also constantly lethargic and I find it very hard to focus. Easily depressed and lacking mental clarity. And recently, my mother told me that when I was very young, I would hold my stool until I couldn’t take it anymore. I also had hand-foot-and mouth disease at one point as a child. I don’t know if either of these things may have anything to do with my symptoms. I’ve tried organic psyllium husk after drugstore products failed. Nothing keeps me regular. Please, serious answers only!
@Eamonn, are you sure you’re a nurse? I looked up the symptoms on webmd and I don’t have them. I said serious answers only.
@Blondie, I understand not having every symptom, but I didn’t seem to have ANY symptom. I have had much bloodwork done in the past year, and Chrohn’s didn’t come up.
@Dr. Parsons, spread that spam somewhere else. Seriously.

Helen answers:

“I tested negative for hypothyroidism ” Do not count on it! It is missed more than found! This sounds exactly like what it probably is!

There are soooooo many possible symptoms of thyroid disease ..it effects everything. IBS w/ constipation is very common w/ it.

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

I had had the severe constipation all my life til starting treatment w/ Synthroid.

God bless

David asks…

fingers, toes, noes ears and sometimes lips are constantly cold?!?

when i’m inside my house which is heated, (it’s on 70 right now, super warm) my fingers, toes, nose and ears are really cold! Everybody always tells me how cold my hands are and when i feel everybody elses hands they’re always very warm. I am constantly trying to warm my hands up by rubbing them together and clenching them in fists. It’s been like this for as long as i can remember! When I go outside in the cold my fingers, toes, nose , ears and lips will be icy cold and will turn BLUE!! they’ll be numb! I’m pretty sure this isn’t bad circulation because the symptoms to that are smoking and being overweight. I’m on a strict vegan diet, i dont smoke and I exercise at least 3 times a week. I’m very healthy

What could this be?! ugh

Helen answers:

Bad circulation maybe hereditary my dad has bad circulation and i get that from him so in the winter time i suffer abit but not to the point of going blue that’s something you should see your doctor about.

Edit 2 I looked this up for you as it showed all your symptons

A feeling of cold in the hands and/or feet — or sensitivity to the cold — is a common complaint in people with hypothyroidism. Typically, if you’re a thyroid patient experiencing these symptoms, the cold sensitivity and cold extremities will decrease usually significantly after you’ve received appropriate treatment for your underactive thyroid.
But in some thyroid patients, symptoms continue. When cold hands and/or feet persist, you should be evaluated for Raynaud’s syndrome. Raynaud’s (sometimes also spelled Reynaud’s) is also known as Raynaud’s phenomenom. It’s a disease that involves an interruption in the blood flow to fingers and toes (and sometimes nose and ears), due to spasms in the blood vessels.

An excellent review of the diagnostic tests for Raynaud’s is featured in this Guide to Raynaud’s.

Some common triggers for Raynaud’s include:
•Going outside during frigid temperatures
•Holding an iced drink
•Walking into an air conditioned room
•Putting your hands in the freezer
•Putting hands under cold water
•Emotional stress
During a Raynaud’s attack, the affected area typically turns white, and as oxygen fails to reach the extremities, they can turn blue. You may feel tingling or painful throbbing, and the affected area may swell. Symptoms can resolve quickly or may last for hours.
Raynaud’s is a condition seen on its own, but also shows up as a “secondary” disease alongside other autoimmune diseases, including Hashimoto’s disease, Graves’ disease, lupus, Sjögren’s Syndrome, scleroderma, and rheumatoid arthritis, among others.

Treatments

If your symptoms are due to Raynaud’s, beyond proper thyroid treatment, avoiding or minimizing cold exposure is a key way to avoid symptoms. If you are a smoker, you should also stop smoking, as that is known to aggravate symptoms. Biofeedback treatments may also be a help for some patients.

Drug treatments can help, but the drugs used may have various side effects. Some of the drug treatments currently being used for Raynaud’s include:
•Calcium channel blockers such as nifedipine (brand names Adalat, Nifedical, and Procardia)
•Angiotensin II inhibitors i.e., candesartan (Atacand), irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), and valsartan (Diovan).
•The antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac)
•The vasodilator sildenafil (Viagra)

Betty asks…

Anyone with Lupus?

I am wondering about those who have Lupus what your symptoms are?

Helen answers:

I gave the following answer to a similar question some time ago. I copy it here in the hope that it will assist you.
The idea that lupus is generally a fatal disease is one of the gravest misconceptions about this illness. In fact, the prognosis of lupus is much better today than ever before. It is true that medical science has not yet developed a method for curing lupus and some people do die from the disease. However, people with non-organ threatening disease can look forward to a normal lifespan if they follow the instructions of their physician, take their medication(s) as prescribed, and know when to seek help for unexpected side effects of a medication or a new manifestation of their lupus. Although some people with lupus have severe recurrent attacks and are frequently hospitalized, most people with lupus rarely require hospitalization. There are many lupus patients who never have to be hospitalized, especially if they are careful and follow their physician’s instructions. New research brings unexpected findings each year. The progress made in treatment and diagnosis during the last decade has been greater than that made over the past 100 years. It is therefore a sensible idea to maintain control of a disease that tomorrow may be curable.
Hope this is informative
Matador 89

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Mandy asks…

under active thyroid ?

Why do I have this what causes it ? what’s happening to my body ? what side effects can i get from the tabelts? (levothyroxine) what happens if I just stop taken the tablets for a long time ?
How long does it take for the tablets to start working ?

Thanks :)

Helen answers:

DO NOT STOP! This is not like medicine…this replaces thyroid hormones that are missing like other supplements do. There should be NO side effects. This takes quite some time to make a difference.

Here is lots of info for you:
You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless

Susan asks…

How can hyperthyroid cause weight gain?

I read on a website that one of the side effects is weight loss OR weight gain. I thought hyperthyroid INCREASED your metabolism, so can someone please explain this to me.

Helen answers:

What you are thinking is usually correct … Now if one had hypER as a cycle of Hashimoto’s then that would explain…a person then went into hypO mode and gained.

Here is some info:
You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless

Mark asks…

define autoimmune hepatitis?

Helen answers:

Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease in which the body’s immune system attacks liver cells. This causes the liver to become inflamed (hepatitis). Researchers think a genetic factor may predispose some people to autoimmune diseases. About 70 percent of those with autoimmune hepatitis are women, most between the ages of 15 and 40.

The disease is usually quite serious and, if not treated, gets worse over time. It’s usually chronic, meaning it can last for years, and can lead to cirrhosis (scarring and hardening) of the liver and eventually liver failure.

Autoimmune hepatitis is classified as either type I or II. Type I is the most common form in North America. It occurs at any age and is more common among women than men. About half of those with type I have other autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, proliferative glomerulonephritis, thyroiditis, Graves’ disease, Sjögren’s syndrome, autoimmune anemia, and ulcerative colitis. Type II autoimmune hepatitis is less common, typically affecting girls ages 2 to 14, although adults can have it too

Autoimmune Disease
One job of the immune system is to protect the body from viruses, bacteria, and other living organisms. Usually, the immune system does not react against the body’s own cells. However, sometimes it mistakenly attacks the cells it is supposed to protect. This response is called autoimmunity. Researchers speculate that certain bacteria, viruses, toxins, and drugs trigger an autoimmune response in people who are genetically susceptible to developing an autoimmune disorder

Symptoms
Fatigue is probably the most common symptom of autoimmune hepatitis. Other symptoms include

enlarged liver

jaundice

itching

skin rashes

joint pain

abdominal discomfort

fatigue
spider angiomas (abnormal blood vessels) on the skin

nausea

vomiting

loss of appetite

dark urine

pale or gray colored stools

People in advanced stages of the disease are more likely to have symptoms such as fluid in the abdomen (ascites) or mental confusion. Women may stop having menstrual periods.

Symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis range from mild to severe. Because severe viral hepatitis or hepatitis caused by a drug—for example, certain antibiotics—has the same symptoms, tests may be needed for an exact diagnosis. Your doctor should also review and rule out all your medicines before diagnosing autoimmune hepatitis.

Treatment
Treatment works best when autoimmune hepatitis is diagnosed early. With proper treatment, autoimmune hepatitis can usually be controlled. In fact, recent studies show that sustained response to treatment not only stops the disease from getting worse, but also may actually reverse some of the damage.

The primary treatment is medicine to suppress (slow down) an overactive immune system.

Both types of autoimmune hepatitis are treated with daily doses of a corticosteroid called prednisone. Your doctor may start you on a high dose (20 to 60 mg per day) and lower the dose to 5 to 15 mg/day as the disease is controlled. The goal is to find the lowest possible dose that will control your disease.

Another medicine, azathioprine (Imuran) is also used to treat autoimmune hepatitis. Like prednisone, azathioprine suppresses the immune system, but in a different way. It helps lower the dose of prednisone needed, thereby reducing its side effects. Your doctor may prescribe azathioprine, in addition to prednisone, once your disease is under control.

Most people will need to take prednisone, with or without azathioprine, for years. Some people take it for life. Corticosteroids may slow down the disease, but everyone is different. In about one out of every three people, treatment can eventually be stopped. After stopping, it is important to carefully monitor your condition and promptly report any new symptoms to your doctor because the disease may return and be even more severe, especially during the first few months after stopping treatment.

In about 7 out of 10 people, the disease goes into remission, with a lessening of severity of symptoms, within 2 years of starting treatment. A portion of persons with a remission will see the disease return within 3 years, so treatment may be necessary on and off for years, if not for life.

James asks…

Why is prednisone prescribed for dogs?

My cocker spaniel is 10 years old and she’s slowing down like an older dog. A month ago, she woke up in such pain that she didn’t even want to stand up. Over the next three weeks, she could barely lift her head to look at me, and I thought it was her spine because all four legs were going willy-nilly. She couldn’t even coordinate her legs to stand on my tile floor to eat or drink because her legs kept slipping out from under her.

I had some prednisone pills left over (2 years ago) from another dog who had a stroke. I cut the 10 mg pills in half and gave her half in the morning and half in the evening. After a few days, she was back to her old-dog self, and she was able to control her limbs. I thought she was on her death bed, but she convinced me not to dig her grave yet.

I lowered her dose to half a pill every morning. Now she’s down to a quarter tablet every morning. What I want to know is if I should wean her off completely or take her to my vet to get a new prescription. I don’t have extra money to go to the vet every time I want to, but I don’t want my dog suffering in pain.

Helen answers:

Prednisone is one drug that is often used for treating autoimmune diseases in dogs. It is a synthetic, inactive corticosteroid that is chemically converted by the liver into prednisolone, an active steroid. The benefits of using the drug for treating a number of conditions in humans and animals have been established over time. Prednisone has varied and diverse uses. Some examples are as follows:

1.Treatment of excessive itching
2.Alleviation of asthma and other allergies
3.Managing emergencies like injuries to the spinal chord
4.Controlling rejections during organ transplants
5.Treating kidney disorders
On one hand, the manner in which this drug works allows it to be extremely versatile. It suppresses the immune system; therefore, it can be used to treat auto-immune, inflammatory, and kidney diseases.

On the other hand, the side effects that prednisone causes are burdensome for the pet owner. The following side effects can present themselves even when the drug is used for a short period of time:

1.Renal disorders
2.Abnormal thirst levels
3.Excessive hunger
Side effects that occur after a considerable period of usage are as follows:

1.Ulcers in the digestive tract
2.Pain and inflammation in pancreas
3.Diabetes
4.Degeneration of muscles
5.Unpredictable change in behaviors
The most dangerous side effect that can appear while administering prednisone is hyperadrenocorticism in dogs . Also known as Cushing’s disease, this condition is caused by an inadvertent overdose of the drug.

Since it is a corticosteroid itself, prednisone obstructs the proper functioning of the adrenal glands. If the drug is continued for more than a week, it can affect the normal functioning of the adrenal glands on a permanent basis. This results in a dependency on the drug, since the body is unable to create its own natural corticosteroids.

Though prednisone seems like a wonder drug at times, indiscriminate use of this drug can be very dangerous. It can lead to conditions like Cushing’s disease in dogs and also Addison’s disease, both of which can prove to be fatal

Jenny asks…

Extremely Cold feet and hands?

Why are my hands and feet freezing???? Please help
I am really scared is rthis bad???

HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Could this happen to any body any age or weight????

Helen answers:

A feeling of cold in the hands and/or feet — or sensitivity to the cold — is a common complaint in people with hypothyroidism. Typically, if you’re a thyroid patient experiencing these symptoms, the cold sensitivity and cold extremities will decrease usually significantly after you’ve received appropriate treatment for your underactive thyroid.
But in some thyroid patients, symptoms continue. When cold hands and/or feet persist, you should be evaluated for Raynaud’s syndrome. Raynaud’s (sometimes also spelled Reynaud’s) is also known as Raynaud’s phenomenom. It’s a disease that involves an interruption in the blood flow to fingers and toes (and sometimes nose and ears), due to spasms in the blood vessels.

An excellent review of the diagnostic tests for Raynaud’s is featured in this Guide to Raynaud’s.

Some common triggers for Raynaud’s include:

Going outside during frigid temperatures
Holding an iced drink
Walking into an air conditioned room
Putting your hands in the freezer
Putting hands under cold water
Emotional stress
During a Raynaud’s attack, the affected area typically turns white, and as oxygen fails to reach the extremities, they can turn blue. You may feel tingling or painful throbbing, and the affected area may swell. Symptoms can resolve quickly or may last for hours.
Raynaud’s is a condition seen on its own, but also shows up as a “secondary” disease alongside other autoimmune diseases, including Hashimoto’s disease, Graves’ disease, lupus, Sjögren’s Syndrome, scleroderma, and rheumatoid arthritis, among others.

Treatments

If your symptoms are due to Raynaud’s, beyond proper thyroid treatment, avoiding or minimizing cold exposure is a key way to avoid symptoms. If you are a smoker, you should also stop smoking, as that is known to aggravate symptoms. Biofeedback treatments may also be a help for some patients.

Drug treatments can help, but the drugs used may have various side effects. Some of the drug treatments currently being used for Raynaud’s include:

Calcium channel blockers such as nifedipine (brand names Adalat, Nifedical, and Procardia)
Angiotensin II inhibitors i.e., candesartan (Atacand), irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), and valsartan (Diovan).
The antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac)
The vasodilator sildenafil (Viagra)

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Richard asks…

Why is propylthiouracil used to treat hyperthyroidism?

What is its effect on metabolic rate?

Helen answers:

Propylthiouracil, or PTU, actually suppresses thyroid hormone. It treats the hyperthyroidism directly, and it thereby slows metabolic rate.

It is used despite the high rate of side effects because it causes a remission of Grave’s disease about half of the time and so about half of people with Grave’s diseases who use it, can go off of it and need no further treatment.

Laura asks…

Has anyone had a thyroid taken out? Does it leave a horrible scar on your neck? Should I go noninvasive?

They have medicine that can just kill my thyroid. I have to have it taken out or killed. Medicine is not working for me, bad side effects. Thank you

Helen answers:

I have thyroid disease. It runs in my family and I have several members with thyroid problems, including thyroid cancer and Grave’s Disease. Unless you have thyroid cancer or Grave’s Disease, usually removing or killing off your thyroid isn’t a good idea. It’s true that although Grave’s Disease can be corrected with medication, sometimes that doesn’t work and you do end up having to have your thyroid killed off or removed. If that is what is going on with you, be forewarned, you will need to be on medication for the rest of your life after your thyroid is killed off or removed because your body will no longer be getting the correct thyroid hormones it needs and you will then become what is called Hypothyroid. You will need to be on thyroid hormone replacement such as Armour Thyroid, Synthroid, Levothyroxine, Levoxyl, Levothroid, Unithroid, Cytomel or Thyrolar. Without thyroid hormone replacement you will become very ill and could have some serious, if not life threatening problems.

When taking thyroid hormone replacement many people need T3, the active form of thyroid hormone, to feel well because their bodies won’t convert T4 (the thyroid hormone that is in most thyroid hormone replacement medications) into T3. While controversial, some studies have shown that patients have improvement in overall symptoms when they add T3 to their treatment. Many patients favor T4+T3 therapy, versus T4 alone. If someone is taking Synthroid or another Levothyroxine drug like Levoxyl, Levothroid, or Unithroid (all only have T4), I always recommend they ask their doctor about adding Cytomel (the brand name for synthetic T3) to their treatment if their doctor refuses to prescribe Armour. Or they could have their doctor add compounded, time-released T3, or have their doctor switch them to Thyrolar (a synthetic T4+T3 drug). But the overall best is Armour Thyroid, a natural desiccated thyroid drug. Also there are two other brands of natural thyroid medication called Westhroid and Nature-throid which also have the combination of all the T hormones, including T4 and T3. Armour contains all the hormones your thyroid normally produces such as T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, etc. Natural thyroid medication like Armour, Westhroid and Naturethroid are the only thyroid medications that do have all the naturally occurring hormones. It is always better to try and replicate what your body does naturally and that’s why Armour works so well.

Get a second opinion from a doctor that is not in the same medical group. But, your doctor probably is correct, you probably do need to have your thyroid killed off or removed. I know someone who had her thyroid removed due to cancer. She was left with an ugly scar going across her neck and she is such a beautiful girl that it’s a shame she has that ugly scar. I would read up on all the pros and cons of having your thyroid removed vs. Having it killed off and see which is a better option for you. Do some online research using Google. Sit down and ask your doctor questions about your treatment options.

I highly recommend you get the book, “Living Well with Hypothyroidism” by Mary J. Shomon. Its easy reading and you will learn a lot about your disease, as this book covers not just hypothyroidism, but also thyroid cancer, Grave’s Disease and other thyroid problems. The woman who wrote it, Mary J. Shomon, had her thyroid removed. This book saved my life because it taught me all about how to manage my thyroid disease so I would feel my best. You can buy this book on Amazon.com for as little as $1.47 used or you can buy it in a book store. If the book store doesn’t have it, have them order it for you.

William asks…

Is this Autoimmune Hepatitis?

About this time last year i was diagnosed hepatitis A. I didn’t have it for that long, i think it went away quicker than most, but a few mouths ago i noticed i would get a slight pain in my right abdomen area every so often(but i put it down to relapse symptoms) The pain its self isn’t that bad it doesn’t last very long either…most of the time i barely notice it. About a few days ago i have been getting very itchy all over. I don’t appear to have a rash of any kind. It’s not a constant itch either, it comes and goes…especially when i think about it (like now lol)
My eyes are kinda yellow…i don’t know if they even went back to normal when i had hepatitis last.
The thing is, now i am not sure whether i am itchy because i am thinking about it, or is it a symptom of something

Helen answers:

Autoimmune Hepatitis

Autoimmune Disease
Symptoms
Diagnosis
Treatment
Side Effects
Other Treatments
Hope through Research
Points to Remember
For More Information

Autoimmune hepatitis affects
the liver.
Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease in which the body’s immune system attacks liver cells. This causes the liver to become inflamed (hepatitis). Researchers think a genetic factor may predispose some people to autoimmune diseases. About 70 percent of those with autoimmune hepatitis are women, most between the ages of 15 and 40.

The disease is usually quite serious and, if not treated, gets worse over time. It’s usually chronic, meaning it can last for years, and can lead to cirrhosis (scarring and hardening) of the liver and eventually liver failure.

Autoimmune hepatitis is classified as either type I or II. Type I is the most common form in North America. It occurs at any age and is more common among women than men. About half of those with type I have other autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, proliferative glomerulonephritis, thyroiditis, Graves’ disease, Sjögren’s syndrome, autoimmune anemia, and ulcerative colitis. Type II autoimmune hepatitis is less common, typically affecting girls ages 2 to 14, although adults can have it too.

[Top]

Autoimmune Disease
One job of the immune system is to protect the body from viruses, bacteria, and other living organisms. Usually, the immune system does not react against the body’s own cells. However, sometimes it mistakenly attacks the cells it is supposed to protect. This response is called autoimmunity. Researchers speculate that certain bacteria, viruses, toxins, and drugs trigger an autoimmune response in people who are genetically susceptible to developing an autoimmune disorder.

[Top]

Symptoms
Fatigue is probably the most common symptom of autoimmune hepatitis. Other symptoms include

enlarged liver

jaundice

itching

skin rashes

joint pain

abdominal discomfort

fatigue
spider angiomas (abnormal blood vessels) on the skin

nausea

vomiting

loss of appetite

dark urine

pale or gray colored stools

People in advanced stages of the disease are more likely to have symptoms such as fluid in the abdomen (ascites) or mental confusion. Women may stop having menstrual periods.

Symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis range from mild to severe. Because severe viral hepatitis or hepatitis caused by a drug—for example, certain antibiotics—has the same symptoms, tests may be needed for an exact diagnosis. Your doctor should also review and rule out all your medicines before diagnosing autoimmune hepatitis.

Betty asks…

Hypothyroidism and Levothyroxine?

I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism a week ago, and put on Levothyroxine as a result. I’m very excited to have more energy and just feel better in general, but I understand that weight loss is also a common side effect of this medication. Can anyone share their weight loss experiences, i.e. how much weight per week or per month that you have lost? I’m just trying to figure out what to expect. Thanks so much!

Helen answers:

Levo does not work that fast. Weight loss is NOT a side effect. Weight gain comes from the disease & the meds hopefully stops most of us from gaining more.

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. They can code so that ins will pay.

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

Lizzie asks…

thyroid problem.. please help?

my mother aged 69.. is suffering from thyroid problem. please let me know best treatment available in medical and also in alternate medicine and if any other type of treatment if available. how much time does it takes to fully recover. and is full cure there.

Helen answers:

Hi,
I am a med student and we just covered this in pharmacology and endocrine lecures. It all depends on which type of thyroid problem she has.
Possible thyroid problems are hypofunction: caused by any number of things: not enough secretion of TRH (thyroid releasing hormone) from the hypothalamus, undersecretion of TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) from the pituitary, TSH receptor destruction from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, or insufficent iodine uptake (normally in salt).
Hyperfunction: over secretion of TRH, TSH, toxic multinodular goiter (not as bad as it sounds), adenoma (one of the easiest cancers to treat), or graves disease (an autoimmune disease where antibodies bind to the TSH receptors in the thyroid and cause over secretion).
Treatments are as follows: (These are the only FDA approved ones)
For Hypofunction: (unfortunately not curable, just very manageable with treatment)

synthetic T4: called levothyroxine (aka: synthroid), takes 4-6 weeks for maximum action, but results in stable levels.

Synthetic T3: called cytomel, takes 3-6 days for max action, but not as stable levels of thyroid hormones.

For Hashimoto’s it is often necessary to titrate the doses up and down weekly untill there is a stable period (which can last weeks to years, this is a life long process).

For Hyperfunction: Most cases are curable others are manageable.

Thionamides (destroy thyroid cells):
Tapezole and PTU are the two drugs used. Takes a few weeks to have max effect because of stored thyroid hormone. Only on it for a few weeks to a month or so depending on severity.
Tapezole is first line. (Mostly for Graves Disease)

Radioactive Iodine (RAI-131): Very good treatment
Overactive cells take up the iodine and are destroyed, but the normal cells are not effected. It is normally a one time pill NOT chemo therapy (no really bad side effects). No studies have shown increased risk of future cancer with this. It is very safe and effective. (For everything else)

Surgery: not used commonly anymore because of complications and RAI-131 effectiveness. It is only used in people who have really large goiters which obstruct swollowing or cause significant discomfort, or people who refuse RAI-131. Can cause other problems like hypofunction if too much is taken out, or if a parathyroid gland is removed too it may cause calcium problems (affecting bones and kidneys).

Beta Blockers: when not contrindicated (you mother is not taking another drug which may interact with it) is used with other treatments to lessen the symptoms caused by hyperthyroidism: tachycardia, hypertension, and others.

Hope this helps

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Chris asks…

What side effects would someone get if they took synthroid and they didn’t need it ,misdiagnosed?

Is it possible not to get side effects from Synthroid thyroxine t4 hormone when taking it for nothing. Is numbness or dull skin a possible side effect from syntroid.

Helen answers:

It is very dangerous … This is not medicine but a replacement for a missing hormone. Taking it like this could cause you to have a heart attack!

Curious as to why you say ‘misdiagnosed’ – perhaps not ….here is some info:

You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless

David asks…

Are there side effects to thyroid hormone replacement?

I am only 24 years old and have just been diagnosed with an under active thyroid.

Pretty well all the women in my family have an under active thyroid which lead me to get tested. It doesn’t really affect my life having this condition, I would just say that it effects my mood swings and menstrual cycle more than anything, I can’t say I get overly tired (well not compared to my family), but I do struggle to loose weight (I currently weigh 165 lbs and stand 5″ 5)

So my question is, will going on the thyroid hormone replacement have any major side effects for me? Will I start to loose weight? or will it make me gain weight? will my mood swings settle down? I only ask on here as it is a touchy subject with the women in my family as they are all quite big..

Please let me know your experiences, thanks

Helen answers:

You may do better than the other ladies just because of getting diagnosed early … I say early since you are not having many of the symptoms yet. If anything, the medicine should help you to at least not gain further.

Info for you:
You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, would not matter if ANTIBODIES are present. Indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between hyper & hypo at start)…main cause of HypOthyroid & is worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid).

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

God bless

Maria asks…

my thyroid blood test is tsh 0.13*?

Free t4 = 25* pmol/L (11.0-21.0)
Free t3 = 4.3 pmol/L (3, 1.6.0)

TSH RECEPTOR ANTIBODIES = 5.4* lu /L (<1.8)

This is the results of my blood test . What do you think of think .

Helen answers:

You have Graves’ Disease.

The thyroid has receptors to take in signals from the brain, and it usually makes thyroid hormone only in response to the brain making thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH).

Sometimes the immune system mistakes the receptors in the thyroid for foreign cells, and attacks them with TSH receptor antibodies. In that case, the thyroid gets confused and thinks that it needs to make more thyroid hormone. That’s the situation in Grave’s disease.

Grave’s disease is a serious disease that must be treated. If it’s not treated, it will cause heart disease, psychiatric disease, tremor, weight loss, eye disease, and often death (generally that would take years but if a person’s unlucky it could cause a heart attack sooner). There are three broad possible categories for treatment:

– Radioactive iodine can be used. The thyroid uses iodine way more than any other part of the body. A low dose of radioactive iodine may be used to take pictures of the thyroid, a dose about a thousand times as high is used to damage the thyroid in treatment of Grave’s disease, and a dose another thousand times higher is used for thyroid cancers.
After treatment with a dosage to damage the thyroid for Grave’s disease, it’s likely (about 80% chance) that you would develop hypothyroidism and would need to take one pill per day of thyroid hormone. It’s possible (about 20% chance) that you would have the right amount of thyroid remaining for normal thyroid hormone levels despite Grave’s disease, and it’s possible (about 1% chance) that you would STILL have too much thyroid hormone production from the remaining thyroid tissue.
Radiation is NOT an option if you are pregnant or under age 18.

– You can take medication such as methimazole. These have the advantage that in about half of cases (and you’re a good candidate because you have a low positive antibody result) you would go into remission after about a year or so, and never need any further treatment. The disadvantage is that in a small portion of cases the drugs cause very serious side effects like an inability to make certain white blood cells, so you need to be monitored closely while on the medication.

– If neither medication nor radiation is a good option (or if neither one has worked), you may have either the entire or part of the thyroid removed. Afterwards, you might need to take thyroid hormone.

Donna asks…

Thyroid pain and recovery question?

Hello i am 17, i have had excruciating pain for over a year. My doctor told me my thyroid is not working i am going to see a special doctor next month, i had my blood drawn. This has caused my depression and my sleep loss and weight loss! I weight 82 pounds, but i eat about 5 meals a day. I go days without sleep! It hurts me to use the stairs and lift things, i heard if the doctors can’t help me i could slip into a coma is that true???? I also heard if they can help me then i will be able to sleep, use the stair on my own, gain weight, and not be depressed is this true??? I’m scared

Helen answers:

If you have Grave’s Disease, a disease in which the thyroid makes too much thyroid hormone, then yes, the treatment will help you to be able to sleep and gain weight, and it will probably help your depression and give you the energy to lift things and climb stairs (it will also help your heart).

Graves Disease has three possible treatments-
1. Radiating the thyroid so it can’t make thyroid hormone. If this destroys enough of the thyroid, you will then become hypothyroid (right now it sounds like you are hyperthyroid) and will need thyroid hormone replacement the rest of your life.
2. Medications that suppress the thyroid function. This sometimes causes the body to heal itself (remission) but the medications can have side effects. If it works well, you will not need future medication.
3. Surgery to remove the thyroid. Afterwards you would need to take thyroid replacement hormones.

Hyperthyroidism is pretty unpleasant, and the treatments are not totally safe, but they will probably change your life in a way that will make you feel a lot better.

Sharon asks…

My Shih Tzu puppy has myasthenia gravis. has anyone know of this disease in puppy’s?

Myasthenia gravis in dogs. How do they get it. I think from immunizations. Can anyone help me?

Helen answers:

I got this from a web site but they need doctor help and mediciene

Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease affecting the neuromuscular junction and producing weakness of voluntary muscles. It is a chronic disease deriving its name from Latin and Greek words meaning “grave muscle weakness.” This myasthenia gravis homepage contains a collection of LINKS to excellent sources of information needed by patients and families of patients to help them understand their disease, treatments and the side effects of medications. These sources are by no means the only (or even best) sources and patients should seek out others as well. NOTE: Decisions on individual treatments should always be determined by a physician. The information obtained here is for education only.

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Sandra asks…

how to help someone with Graves Disease?

Hello

My older sister has Graves disease she’s getting treatment for it, but I would like to know how I could help her out so she can feel better. I’m going to buy her some flowers to give her when I see her later.

Helen answers:

Graves disease often responds well to treatment. However, thyroid surgery or radioactive iodine usually will cause hypothyroidism. Without getting the correct dose of thyroid hormone replacement, hypothyroidism can lead to:–
* Depression
* Mental and physical sluggishness
* Weight gain
Antithyroid medications can also have serious side effects.

Susan asks…

i might have auto immune disease and hyperthyroidism what can happen to me if i do?

Helen answers:

So you might have Grave’s Disease? You can experience a lot of side effects/ symptoms, even heart failure if you have severe hyperthyroidism. The usual treatment options are anti-thyroid drugs, there are other options if that does not help.

Thomas asks…

What does the disease called mayasthamia or myasthamia mean? give me details of its symptoms and its treatment

it is a disease related to muscles

Helen answers:

Hi,

This is called Myasthenia. Pl. Find here the details asked by you

Myasthenia gravis is a neuromuscular disease characterized by varying degrees of weakness and rapid fatigue of the skeletal (voluntary) muscles of the body. The name myasthenia gravis, which is Latin and Greek in origin, literally means “grave muscle weakness.” With current therapies, however, most cases of myasthenia gravis are not as “grave” as the name implies. The hallmark of myasthenia gravis is muscle weakness that increases during periods of activity and improves after periods of rest. Certain muscles such as those that control eye and eyelid movement, facial expression, chewing, talking, and swallowing are often, but not always, involved. The muscles that control breathing and neck and limb movements may also be affected.

The Causes

Myasthenia gravis is a defect in which the transmission of nerve impulses to muscles is affected. Normally, when impulses travel down the nerve, the nerve endings release a neurotransmitter substance called acetylcholine. Acetylcholine travels through the neuromuscular junction and binds to receptors which are activated and generate a muscle contraction. In myasthenia gravis, antibodies block, alter, or destroy the receptors for acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction which prevents the muscle contraction from occurring. These antibodies are produced by the body’s own immune system.

Acetylcholine comes packed in vesicles and it is released into the synaptic cleft

The symptoms

Although myasthenia gravis may affect any voluntary muscle, muscles that control eye and eyelid movement, facial expression, and swallowing are most frequently affected. The onset of the disorder may be sudden and the symptoms often are not immediately recognized. In most cases, the first noticeable symptom is weakness of the eye muscles. In others, difficulty in swallowing and slurred speech may be the first signs.

The degree of muscle weakness involved in myasthenia gravis varies greatly among patients, ranging from a localized form limited to eye muscles to a severe or generalized form in which many muscles – sometimes including those that control breathing – are affected.
Symptoms may include drooping of one or both eyelids (ptosis), blurred or double vision (diplopia) due to weakness of the muscles that control eye movements, unstable or waddling gait, weakness in arms, hands, fingers, legs, and neck, a change in facial expression, difficulty in swallowing and shortness of breath, and impaired speech (dysarthria).

The treatment

Myasthenia gravis can be controlled though not cured. There are several therapies available to help reduce and improve muscle weakness.

Medications: Medicines used to treat the disorder include agents such as neostigmine and pyridostigmine, which help improve neuromuscular transmission and increase muscle strength. Immunosuppressive drugs such as prednisone, cyclosporine, and azathioprine may also be used. These medications improve muscle strength by suppressing the production of abnormal antibodies. They must be used with careful medical followup because they may cause major side effects.

Surgery: Thymectomy, the surgical removal of the thymus gland (which is abnormal in myasthenia gravis patients), improves symptoms in more than 50 percent of patients and may cure some individuals, possibly by re-balancing the immune system.

Plasmapheresis: This is a procedure in which abnormal antibodies are removed from the blood. Blood is taken, passed through a filter that removes the specific antibodies and then returned to the body.
A neurologist, along with the primary care physician, will determine which treatment option is best for each individual depending on the severity of the weakness, which muscles are affected, and the individual’s age and other associated medical problems. Physical and occupational therapy may also be suggested.

Sandy asks…

Gaining weight on Synthroid why is that not on side effects?

I was diagnosed with Hypothyroidism 6 months ago and I never had ANY symptoms.

I’m 21 years old and led a very active lifestyle up until I broke my leg severely and was sitting around doing nothing for a really long time. I then got in a routine of sitting too much for like 6 months but I didn’t gain any weight and a few months later, I developed insomnia for a few weeks.

I went to the doctor and they told me I had an underactive thyroid and that i need to take synthroid immediately. i looked on side effects and it scared me a bit but not too bad. then i went online and a lot of people were complaining they were gaining weight. i laughed thinking they were just lazy and ate too much..boy was I wrong! I was 121 pounds for the past 6 YEARS and after starting synthroid 6 months ago, I am now 160!!!!!! I never in my life was more than 130 and I work out AT A GYM and at home like I always do!! I even jog around the block for 1 hour and NOTHING. I’ve been gaining 6 pounds a month! I don’t even eat anything but fruits and veggies and some fish..nothing in my diet has changed!

I told the doctor I need to go on something else before I get obese! I was always a size SMALL now I’m in LARGE! I’m depressed, I want to die..people look at me oddly now and when I blame it on the meds no one believes me because I live in an apartment by myself they must assume I eat secretly but I don’t! The doctor says I need to stay on it and that she thinks my body is still adjusting. 6 MONTHS and I gained nearly 40 pounds! 6 more months = 40 more pounds! that’s 200 pounds = very obese.

please someone help me. i really do exercise and i really do go to the gym. i work out every single day and not lost any weight but gained. i’m so depressed.

Helen answers:

Please do not give up….hang in there. The weight gain is from the disease itself. The treatment is a very slow gradual process to get YOU to YOUR right dose. That said, I assume that you are being restested every 6 wks to see if your meds needs adjusting … If not, you need a new doctor.

There is no reason why you cannot take an anti-depressant until your thyroid is corrected.

You need to also find out if your hypO is from Hashi’s. You need testing for thyroid ANTIBODIES as well as TSH. TSH ‘norm’ should be .3 – 3 (w/ most feeling best at < 2) but, for diagnosis, may not mean much if ANTIBODIES are present which is indicative of Hashimoto’s Autoimmune Thyroiditis (cycles between HYPER & HYPO at start)…it is the main cause of eventual HypOthyroidism but worse (…OR Graves Disease – HypERthyroid from beginning).

You will have to INSIST they test for the antibodies. They can code so that ins will pay.

WARNING: Doctors seem not to want to find/treat thyroid disease. You may have to go to more than one doctor before you get the right tests, interpretation, and treatment. Best wishes.

Ck these:
http://thyroid.about.com/bio/Mary-Shomon-350.htm
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/
http://www.thyrophoenix.com/index.html
http://thyroid.about.com/cs/newsinfo/l/blguidelines.htm

ALWAYS GET COPIES OF YOUR LABS.

God bless you

Chris asks…

sleeping after radioactive iodine treatment?

I was wondering. I live with my mom, I have my own bathroom. I normally sleep on the couch in the living room. My mom’s room/wall is on the opposite side from the couch is it ok for me to sleep there? My dosage was 29mcs, I’m 19, got the pill today at 2 pm for Gravesdisease.

Helen answers:

There is really no line between “this has risk” and “this has no risk”.
It’s more to less risk.

This sounds like very little risk to your mother because:
– Your dose is low for a radioactive iodine dose (if you were dosed for thyroid cancer it would have been many times higher).
– Your mother is not especially young- the younger a person is the more vulnerable she would be to the effects of radiation.
– That’s not really all that close, and it’s through a wall.

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